Journal of
Parasitology and Vector Biology

  • Abbreviation: J. Parasitol. Vector Biol.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2510
  • DOI: 10.5897/JPVB
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 161

Full Length Research Paper

Low prevalence of soil transmitted helminths among children in rural areas in Senegal: A cross sectional survey

Roger C. Tine
  • Roger C. Tine
  • Laboratory of Parasitology and Mycology, Fann Teaching Hospital, Dakar, Senegal.
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Therese Dieng
  • Therese Dieng
  • Laboratory of Parasitology and Mycology, Fann Teaching Hospital, Dakar, Senegal.
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Khadime Sylla
  • Khadime Sylla
  • Laboratory of Parasitology and Mycology, Fann Teaching Hospital, Dakar, Senegal.
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Doudou Sow
  • Doudou Sow
  • Laboratory of Parasitology and Mycology, Fann Teaching Hospital, Dakar, Senegal.
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Souleye Lelo
  • Souleye Lelo
  • Laboratory of Parasitology and Mycology, Fann Teaching Hospital, Dakar, Senegal.
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David Ngom
  • David Ngom
  • Velingara Health District, Ministère de la Santé et de l'Action Sociale, Dakar, Senegal.
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Jacques D. Ndour
  • Jacques D. Ndour
  • Velingara Health District, Ministère de la Santé et de l'Action Sociale, Dakar, Senegal.
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Babacar Faye
  • Babacar Faye
  • Department of Medical Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University Cheikh Anta Diop, Dakar, Senegal.
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Oumar Gaye
  • Oumar Gaye
  • Department of Medical Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University Cheikh Anta Diop, Dakar, Senegal.
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Roger C. Tine
  • Roger C. Tine
  • Laboratory of Parasitology and Mycology, Fann Teaching Hospital, Dakar, Senegal.
  • Google Scholar
Therese Dieng
  • Therese Dieng
  • Laboratory of Parasitology and Mycology, Fann Teaching Hospital, Dakar, Senegal.
  • Google Scholar
Khadime Sylla
  • Khadime Sylla
  • Laboratory of Parasitology and Mycology, Fann Teaching Hospital, Dakar, Senegal.
  • Google Scholar
Doudou Sow
  • Doudou Sow
  • Laboratory of Parasitology and Mycology, Fann Teaching Hospital, Dakar, Senegal.
  • Google Scholar
Souleye Lelo
  • Souleye Lelo
  • Laboratory of Parasitology and Mycology, Fann Teaching Hospital, Dakar, Senegal.
  • Google Scholar
David Ngom
  • David Ngom
  • Velingara Health District, Ministère de la Santé et de l'Action Sociale, Dakar, Senegal.
  • Google Scholar
Jacques D. Ndour
  • Jacques D. Ndour
  • Velingara Health District, Ministère de la Santé et de l'Action Sociale, Dakar, Senegal.
  • Google Scholar
Babacar Faye
  • Babacar Faye
  • Department of Medical Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University Cheikh Anta Diop, Dakar, Senegal.
  • Google Scholar
Oumar Gaye
  • Oumar Gaye
  • Department of Medical Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University Cheikh Anta Diop, Dakar, Senegal.
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  •  Received: 24 September 2017
  •  Accepted: 07 November 2017
  •  Published: 31 January 2018

Abstract

Soil transmitted helminthiasis (STH) represents a major public health problem in tropical regions. In many countries including Senegal, STH control strategies usually involve mass deworming campaigns. This study was carried out to assess the prevalence and distribution of intestinal parasites among children, several years after the initiation of mass deworming campaigns with mebendazole in Senegal. A cross sectional survey was conducted in 8 villages located in the Southeastern part of Senegal. Children younger than 10 years old were sampled using a two level random sampling technique. Stool samples were collected from each participant after clinical assessment. Parasites detection was done by light microscopy using a modified Ritchie technique. Among the 1,163 surveyed children, 353 were found with at least one intestinal parasite species representing an overall prevalence of 30.4% (IC95%: 27.3 to 33.7). Proportion of children with protozoan infections was 29.6% (95%CI: 26.9 to 32.3); a small fraction of children were found with helminthic infestations (0.8%) (95%CI: 0.3 to 1.4). The identified parasites were represented by Giardia intestinalis (17.7%), Entameoba coli (14%), Endolimax nana (0.86%), Hookworm (0.52%), Ascaris lumbricoides (0.17%), and Hymenolepis nana (0.34%). This study revealed a low prevalence of helminthic infestations while protozoan infections remained high. This changing profile in the epidemiology of intestinal parasitic infections among children may require revision of the current deworming policy programme. However, extensive data at the national level are needed to support modification of strategy.

 

Key words: Helminths, protozoan, children, Senegal.