Journal of Public Health and Epidemiology
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Article Number - 74BC59D66924


Vol.10(1), pp. 1-5 , January 2018
DOI: 10.5897/JPHE2016.0960
ISSN: 2141-2316



Full Length Research Paper

Malaria among relatives escorting sick patients during the dry season to Karume Health Centre, Mwanza, Northwestern Tanzania



Erasmus Kamugisha
  • Erasmus Kamugisha
  • Department of Biochemistry, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, Bugando, P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania.
  • Google Scholar
Julius Karol Marwa
  • Julius Karol Marwa
  • Department of Pharmacology, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, Bugando, P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania.
  • Google Scholar
Emelie Lund
  • Emelie Lund
  • Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala University Sweden.
  • Google Scholar
Göte Swedberg
  • Göte Swedberg
  • Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala University Sweden.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 03 August 2017  Accepted: 25 October 2017  Published: 31 January 2018

Copyright © 2018 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


Malaria is still a public health problem in the world. It accounted for an estimated 214 million cases and 438,000 deaths in the year 2015. During the dry season, most people are likely to be asymptomatic and therefore fail to be diagnosed with malaria. This study established the proportion of people who came to health facility, escorting sick relatives and had detectable malaria parasites. This was a cross sectional study. All relatives who escorted sick patients to Karume Health Centre between August and December 2013 were screened for malaria using malaria rapid diagnostic test (mRDT) and single round PCR targeting mitochondrial DNA. A total of 400 relatives were screened for malaria using two methods. Prevalence of malaria was 14.5 and 16.8% by mRDT and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. The prevalence of malaria was higher among febrile patients by methods, mRDT (17.8%) and PCR (17.1%), respectively. The prevalence of asymptomatic malaria was 16.4 and 16.5% by mRDT and PCR, respectively. The overall agreement between the two tests was 87.1% with positive agreement of 63.8% and negative agreement of 91.2%. There were a substantial proportion of patients with malaria who visited the health facilities during the dry season. mRDT and single round PCR targeting mitochondrial DNA had a good agreement and can be used for detection of both symptomatic and asymptomatic malaria. Provider initiated screening can help to improve malaria detection during the dry season, as we move towards reduced malaria prevalence and elimination phase.

Key words: Asymptomatic malaria, prevalence of malaria among relatives, mitochondrial DNA, polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

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APA Kamugisha, E., Marwa, J. K., Lund, E., & Swedberg, G. (2018). Malaria among relatives escorting sick patients during the dry season to Karume Health Centre, Mwanza, Northwestern Tanzania. Journal of Public Health and Epidemiology, 10(1), 1-5.
Chicago Erasmus Kamugisha, Julius Karol Marwa, Emelie Lund and Göte Swedberg. "Malaria among relatives escorting sick patients during the dry season to Karume Health Centre, Mwanza, Northwestern Tanzania." Journal of Public Health and Epidemiology 10, no. 1 (2018): 1-5.
MLA Erasmus Kamugisha, et al. "Malaria among relatives escorting sick patients during the dry season to Karume Health Centre, Mwanza, Northwestern Tanzania." Journal of Public Health and Epidemiology 10.1 (2018): 1-5.
   
DOI 10.5897/JPHE2016.0960
URL http://www.academicjournals.org/journal/JPHE/article-abstract/74BC59D66924

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