Journal of
Medicinal Plants Research

  • Abbreviation: J. Med. Plants Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0875
  • DOI: 10.5897/JMPR
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 3550

Full Length Research Paper

Evaluation of Procavia capensis hyraceum used in traditional medicine for antioxidant activity

Sibusisiwe Magama
  • Sibusisiwe Magama
  • Department of Biology, National University of Lesotho, P. O. Roma 180, Maseru 100, Lesotho, Southern Africa.
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Thabang Rants’o
  • Thabang Rants’o
  • Department of Biology, National University of Lesotho, P. O. Roma 180, Maseru 100, Lesotho, Southern Africa.
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Asita Okorie Asita
  • Asita Okorie Asita
  • Department of Biology, National University of Lesotho, P. O. Roma 180, Maseru 100, Lesotho, Southern Africa.
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Matsepo Taole
  • Matsepo Taole
  • Department of Biology, National University of Lesotho, P. O. Roma 180, Maseru 100, Lesotho, Southern Africa.
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  •  Received: 09 April 2018
  •  Accepted: 26 June 2018
  •  Published: 10 July 2018

Abstract

Hyraceum (HM) used in traditional medicine in Southern Africa is produced by the herbivore Procavia capensis. It is fossilized excreta derived from urine, faecal matter and plant material. In this study a qualitative phytochemical screening, determination of the in vitro antioxidant activity using the 1, 1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and hydrogen peroxide scavenging methods, and determination of the total phenolic content in the crude methanolic (95%) extract were done. Phytochemical screening detected the major phytochemical classes in the hyraceum extract as terpenoids, saponins, polyphenols, quinones, phlobatannins and coumarins with the minor components as flavonoids, alkaloids, tannins, simple phenols, anthocyanins, anthraquinones and amino acids. Total phenolics content was 37.339 mg gallic acid equivalents per gram dry weight (mgGAE/g DW). Effective concentration at 50% (EC50) for HM and L-ascorbic (AA) in DPPH assay was 5.983 and 0.429 µg/ml respectively while in H2O2 scavenging assay EC50 was 5.059 and 1.666 µg/ml, respectively. The antioxidant activity of HM could have been due to the various phenolic and terpenoid antioxidants in the HM. The findings implied that HM was slightly stronger at scavenging H2O2 than at scavenging DPPH. Bioactive compounds in HM could potentially be exploited in further studies as potential antioxidants of therapeutic value.

Key words: Phytochemicals, 1, 1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), hydrogen peroxide.