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Article Number - A46A80C55996


Vol.10(3), pp. 87-98 , March 2018
https://doi.org/10.5897/JDAE2017.0877
ISSN: 2006-9774


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Full Length Research Paper

Does gender matter in effective management of plant disease epidemics? Insights from a survey among rural banana farming households in Uganda



Enoch Mutebi Kikulwe
  • Enoch Mutebi Kikulwe
  • Bioversity International/ CGIAR Research Program on Roots, Tubers and Bananas (RTB), P. O. Box 24384, Kampala, Uganda.
  • Google Scholar
Stanslus Okurut
  • Stanslus Okurut
  • Department of Agribusiness and natural Resource Economics, Makerere University, P. O. BOX 7062, Kampala, Uganda.
  • Google Scholar
Susan Ajambo
  • Susan Ajambo
  • Bioversity International/ CGIAR Research Program on Roots, Tubers and Bananas (RTB), P. O. Box 24384, Kampala, Uganda.
  • Google Scholar
Eisabetta Gotor
  • Eisabetta Gotor
  • Bioversity International/CGIAR Research Program on Roots, Tubers, and Bananas, Via dei Tre Denari, 472/a 00054 Maccarese, Rome, Italy.
  • Google Scholar
Reuben Tendo Ssali
  • Reuben Tendo Ssali
  • Bioversity International/CGIAR Research Program on Roots, Tubers, and Bananas, Via dei Tre Denari, 472/a 00054 Maccarese, Rome, Italy.
  • Google Scholar
Jerome Kubiriba
  • Jerome Kubiriba
  • National Agricultural Research Laboratories of the National Agricultural Research Organization (NARO), P. O. Box 7065, Kampala, Uganda.
  • Google Scholar
Eldad Karamura
  • Eldad Karamura
  • Bioversity International/ CGIAR Research Program on Roots, Tubers and Bananas (RTB), P. O. Box 24384, Kampala, Uganda.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 15 September 2017  Accepted: 30 November 2017  Published: 31 March 2018

Copyright © 2018 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


Crop diseases significantly suppress plant yields and in extreme cases wipe out entire crop species threatening food security and eroding rural livelihoods. It is therefore critical to estimate the extent to which shocks like disease epidemics can affect food availability and the capacity of smallholder farmers to mitigate and reverse the effects of such shocks. This study utilizes sex-disaggregated data from 341 households in Uganda to analyze: first, gender and access to agricultural resources and their control; second, whether men and women in the targeted banana-farming communities share similar perceptions toward the effectiveness of the banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW) control technologies and their respective information dissemination pathways; third, whether gender and farmer perceptions influence  on farm adoption of BXW management practices. Lastly, it determines the impact of adoption of BXW control practices on food security. Results show that whereas most household assets are jointly owned, men have more individual ownership, control, and decision-making on income from household assets than women. Perceptions on effectiveness of BXW control practices and communication channels also differed between men and women. Men rated cutting down of infected plants to be more effective than women, but tissue culture, removal of male buds and disinfecting of farm tools were perceived to be equally effective by both men and women. In addition, apart from newspapers which were more effective in delivering BXW information to men, we found no differences in the effectiveness of other BXW information sources. More importantly, the study finds both gender and farmer perceptions on BXW control to significantly affect adoption of BXW control practices and household food security. For better and sustainable management of plant epidemics in Uganda, it is therefore critical that existing gender-based and underlying perception constraints are addressed.
 
Key words: Gender-based constraints, food security, perceptions, technology adoption, Xanthomonas wilt.

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APA Kikulwe, E. M., Okurut, S., Ajambo, S., Gotor, E., Ssali, R. T., Kubiriba, J., & Karamura, E. (2018). Does gender matter in effective management of plant disease epidemics? Insights from a survey among rural banana farming households in Uganda. Journal of Development and Agricultural Economics, 10(3), 87-98.
Chicago Enoch Mutebi Kikulwe, Stanslus Okurut, Susan Ajambo, Eisabetta Gotor, Reuben Tendo Ssali, Jerome Kubiriba and Eldad Karamura. "Does gender matter in effective management of plant disease epidemics? Insights from a survey among rural banana farming households in Uganda." Journal of Development and Agricultural Economics 10, no. 3 (2018): 87-98.
MLA Enoch Mutebi Kikulwe, et al. "Does gender matter in effective management of plant disease epidemics? Insights from a survey among rural banana farming households in Uganda." Journal of Development and Agricultural Economics 10.3 (2018): 87-98.
   
DOI https://doi.org/10.5897/JDAE2017.0877
URL http://www.academicjournals.org/journal/JDAE/article-abstract/A46A80C55996

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