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Article Number - B112CF655273


Vol.13(1), pp. 1-11 , January 2018
https://doi.org/10.5897/ERR2017.3313
ISSN: 1990-3839


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Full Length Research Paper

Conceptualizing group flow: A framework



Jana Duncan
  • Jana Duncan
  • Instructional Psychology and Technology Department, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, USA.
  • Google Scholar
Richard E. West
  • Richard E. West
  • Instructional Psychology and Technology Department, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, USA.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 01 July 2017  Accepted: 04 December 2017  Published: 10 January 2018

Copyright © 2018 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


This literature review discusses the similarities in main themes between Csikszentmihályi theory of individual flow and Sawyer theory of group flow, and compares Sawyer’s theory with existing concepts in the literature on group work both in education and business. Because much creativity and innovation occurs within groups, understanding group collaboration characteristics, including group flow, is critical to designing, leading, and sustaining effectively creative groups. Sawyer’s theory, being the first to describe flow within groups, can be difficult to conceptualize because of the high number of included constructs. By synthesizing the ideas, we propose a simpler model for conceptualizing group flow consisting of the principles of vision, ownership and contribution, and effective communication. We propose that using this condensed version of Sawyer’s leading principles might enable more research on this important topic, as well as improved practice in developing and leading innovative groups.  
 
Key words: Flow, group flow, education, team productivity, organizational behavior.

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APA Duncan, J., & West, R. E. (2018). Conceptualizing group flow: A framework. Educational Research and Reviews, 13(1), 1-11.
Chicago Jana Duncan and Richard E. West. "Conceptualizing group flow: A framework." Educational Research and Reviews 13, no. 1 (2018): 1-11.
MLA Jana Duncan and Richard E. West. "Conceptualizing group flow: A framework." Educational Research and Reviews 13.1 (2018): 1-11.
   
DOI https://doi.org/10.5897/ERR2017.3313
URL http://www.academicjournals.org/journal/ERR/article-abstract/B112CF655273

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