African Journal of Microbiology Research
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Article Number - E7FB07B64701


Vol.11(22), pp. 927-944 , June 2017
DOI: 10.5897/AJMR2017.8559
ISSN: 1996-0808



Full Length Research Paper

Macrofungal diversity in the forest litter of Nadia District, West Bengal, India



Satadru Pramanik
  • Satadru Pramanik
  • Mycology and Plant Pathology Section, Department of Botany, University of Kalyani, Kalyani-741235, Nadia, West Bengal, India.
  • Google Scholar
Sujata Chaudhuri
  • Sujata Chaudhuri
  • Mycology and Plant Pathology Section, Department of Botany, University of Kalyani, Kalyani-741235, Nadia, West Bengal, India.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 10 April 2017  Accepted: 02 May 2017  Published: 14 June 2017

Copyright © 2017 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


Litter decomposing macrofungi (LDM) and ectomycorrhiza (ECM) play vital roles in maintenance of forest ecosystem. Since these soil-litter dwelling fungi produce lignolytic enzymes, they have been proved useful in soil bioremediation. However, literature of these groups is limited and therefore it is important to record and identify them. This study reports the diversity of litter growing macrofungi in three sal (Shorea robusta C.F. Gaertn.) dominated small forests, that is, Bethuadahari Wildlife Sanctuary (BWS), Ranaghat Forest (RF) and Zafarnagar Forest (ZF) of Nadia, West Bengal India. During the study period (2013 and 2014) 10,253 carpophores, belonging to 37 macrofungal species were sampled and 17 edible, 14 inedible and 4 poisonous species were identified based on previous records. Podoscypha elegans (G. Mey.) Pat. was recorded in India for the first time. Only 7 ECM (~18.91%) and 30 saprophytic (~81.08%) species were recorded. The differences of diversity pattern in the three forests varied significantly. Shannon and Brillouin indices were highest in BWS suggesting the most diverse fungal community in terms of α diversity whereas; β and Taxonomic diversity studies suggested that RF was the most heterogeneous forest among the sampled forests.

 

Key words: Brillouin, diversity, ectomycorrhiza, litter decomposing macrofungi, Shannon.

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APA Pramanik, S., & Chaudhuri, S. (2017). Macrofungal diversity in the forest litter of Nadia District, West Bengal, India. African Journal of Microbiology Research, 11(22), 927-944.
Chicago Satadru Pramanik and Sujata Chaudhuri. "Macrofungal diversity in the forest litter of Nadia District, West Bengal, India." African Journal of Microbiology Research 11, no. 22 (2017): 927-944.
MLA Satadru Pramanik and Sujata Chaudhuri. "Macrofungal diversity in the forest litter of Nadia District, West Bengal, India." African Journal of Microbiology Research 11.22 (2017): 927-944.
   
DOI 10.5897/AJMR2017.8559
URL http://www.academicjournals.org/journal/AJMR/article-abstract/E7FB07B64701

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