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Article Number - 1638B0555040


Vol.9(8), pp. 655-661 , August 2015
DOI: 10.5897/AJEST2015.1912
ISSN: 1996-0786



Full Length Research Paper

Pesticide exposures in a malarious and predominantly farming area in Central Ghana



Kenneth Ayuurebobi Ae-Ngibise
  • Kenneth Ayuurebobi Ae-Ngibise
  • Kintampo Health Research Centre, Ghana Health Service, P. O. Box 200, Brong Ahafo Region, Kintampo, Ghana.
  • Google Scholar
Patrick L. Kinney
  • Patrick L. Kinney
  • Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
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Kwaku Poku Asante
  • Kwaku Poku Asante
  • Kintampo Health Research Centre, Ghana Health Service, P. O. Box 200, Brong Ahafo Region, Kintampo, Ghana.
  • Google Scholar
Darby Jack
  • Darby Jack
  • Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
  • Google Scholar
Ellen Abrafi Boamah
  • Ellen Abrafi Boamah
  • Kintampo Health Research Centre, Ghana Health Service, P. O. Box 200, Brong Ahafo Region, Kintampo, Ghana.
  • Google Scholar
Robin Whyatt
  • Robin Whyatt
  • Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
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Mohammed Mujtaba
  • Mohammed Mujtaba
  • Kintampo Health Research Centre, Ghana Health Service, P. O. Box 200, Brong Ahafo Region, Kintampo, Ghana.
  • Google Scholar
Alexander Manu
  • Alexander Manu
  • Kintampo Health Research Centre, Ghana Health Service, P. O. Box 200, Brong Ahafo Region, Kintampo, Ghana.
  • Google Scholar
Seth Owusu-Agyei
  • Seth Owusu-Agyei
  • Kintampo Health Research Centre, Ghana Health Service, P. O. Box 200, Brong Ahafo Region, Kintampo, Ghana.
  • Google Scholar
Blair J. Wylie
  • Blair J. Wylie
  • Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Vincent Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
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 Received: 06 April 2015  Accepted: 10 July 2015  Published: 30 August 2015

Copyright © 2015 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


In areas where malaria is endemic, pesticides are widely deployed for vector control, which has contributed to reductions in malaria deaths. Pesticide use for agrarian purposes reduces pest populations, thus improving crop production and post-harvest losses. However, adverse health effects have been associated with pesticide exposure, ranging from skin irritation to neurotoxicity and carcinogenicity. Though misuse of these pesticides can lead to widespread potential dangers, the debilitating effects are usually underappreciated in many developing countries. To evaluate the pattern of pesticide usage among rural communities in the Kintampo area of Ghana, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among 1455 heads of households randomly sampled from among 29,073 households in the Kintampo Health and Demographic Surveillance System area of Ghana to estimate the prevalence of pesticide use and indications for use among this rural populace. Seventy-one percent (1040/1455) of household heads reported having used pesticides on either their farms or homes, most commonly for control of weeds (96.4%, 1003/1040) or insects (85.4%, 888/1040). Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) was used by 22.9% (238/1040) of respondents. The majority of households who reported use of pesticides said women in their households assisted in the spraying efforts (69.3%, 721/1040); of these women, 50.8% (366/721) did so while carrying their babies on their backs. Only 28.9% (301/1040) of the study participants wore protective devices during pesticide applications. Frequent symptoms that were reported after spraying, included cough (32.3%; 336/1040), difficulty in breathing (26.7%; 278/1040) and skin irritation (39.0%; 406/1040). Pesticide use among community members in the Kintampo area of Ghana is common and its potential health impacts warrant further investigation. 
 
Key words: Pesticide, malaria, prevalence, Kintampo, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane.
 

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APA Ae-Ngibise, K. A., Kinney, P. L., Asante, K. P., Jack, D., Boamah, E. A., Whyatt, R., Mujtaba, M., Manu, A., Owusu-Agyei, S., & Wylie, B. J. (2015). Pesticide exposures in a malarious and predominantly farming area in Central Ghana. African Journal of Environmental Science and Technology , 9(8), 655-661.
Chicago Kenneth Ayuurebobi Ae-Ngibise, Patrick L. Kinney, Kwaku Poku Asante, Darby Jack, Ellen Abrafi Boamah, Robin Whyatt, Mohammed Mujtaba, Alexander Manu, Seth Owusu-Agyei and Blair J. Wylie. "Pesticide exposures in a malarious and predominantly farming area in Central Ghana." African Journal of Environmental Science and Technology 9, no. 8 (2015): 655-661.
MLA Kenneth Ayuurebobi Ae-Ngibise, et al. "Pesticide exposures in a malarious and predominantly farming area in Central Ghana." African Journal of Environmental Science and Technology 9.8 (2015): 655-661.
   
DOI 10.5897/AJEST2015.1912
URL http://www.academicjournals.org/journal/AJEST/article-abstract/1638B0555040

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