African Journal of Biotechnology
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Article Number - A6AD59A63214


Vol.16(12), pp. 552-557 , March 2017
DOI: 10.5897/AJB2017.15900
ISSN: 1684-5315



Full Length Research Paper

Microsatellite, inter simple sequence repeat and biochemical analyses of Rosa genotypes from Saudi Arabia



Shawkat M. Ahmed*
  • Shawkat M. Ahmed*
  • Biology Department, Faculty of Science, Ta’if University, Ta’if, Saudi Arabia.
  • Google Scholar
Hadeer Y. Darwish
  • Hadeer Y. Darwish
  • Biotechnology Department, Faculty of Science, Ta’if University, Ta’if, Saudi Arabia.
  • Google Scholar
Khalid H. Alamer
  • Khalid H. Alamer
  • Biology Department, Faculty of Science, Ta’if University, Ta’if, Saudi Arabia.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 18 January 2017  Accepted: 03 March 2017  Published: 22 March 2017

Copyright © 2017 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


Rosa damascena Mill. as a main economic crop in the world is planted for beauty and essential oil production in Ta’if region. For the management and improvement of this important crop, genetic variability was evaluated amongst six Rosa genotypes grown in different plantations using microsatellite (simple sequence repeats, SSR), inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and biochemical markers. The six SSR primers showed low level of variation, whereas all ISSR primers generated high levels of polymor-phism ranging from 66.7 to 100%. The biochemical mar¬kers revealed slight polymorphism between the three Rosa species under study. The dendrogram resulted from the combined data of SSR and ISSR splits the 6 genotypes into two main clusters. The first comprised the four R. damascena accessions, and the second grouped R. damascene, Trigintipetala‘and R. hybrid together. ISSR markers can be recommended for the genetic variability analysis in Rosa genome.

Key words: Rosa damascena, microsatellite, inter simple sequence repeat, dendrogram, genetic relationship.

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APA Ahmed, S. M., Darwish, H. Y., & Alamer, K. H. (2017). Microsatellite, inter simple sequence repeat and biochemical analyses of Rosa genotypes from Saudi Arabia. African Journal of Biotechnology , 16(12), 552-557.
Chicago Shawkat M. Ahmed, Hadeer Y. Darwish, and Khalid H. Alamer. "Microsatellite, inter simple sequence repeat and biochemical analyses of Rosa genotypes from Saudi Arabia." African Journal of Biotechnology 16, no. 12 (2017): 552-557.
MLA Shawkat M. Ahmed, et al. "Microsatellite, inter simple sequence repeat and biochemical analyses of Rosa genotypes from Saudi Arabia." African Journal of Biotechnology 16.12 (2017): 552-557.
   
DOI 10.5897/AJB2017.15900
URL http://www.academicjournals.org/journal/AJB/article-abstract/A6AD59A63214

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