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Article Number - 84D23C755917


Vol.17(7), pp. 198-205 , February 2018
https://doi.org/10.5897/AJB2017.16315
ISSN: 1684-5315


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Full Length Research Paper

Tomato yellow leaf curl virus: Diagnosis and metabolites



Ahmed Mohamed Soliman
  • Ahmed Mohamed Soliman
  • Department of Arid Land Agriculture, College of Agriculture and Food Sciences, King Faisal University, P. O. Box 420 Al-Hofuf, Al-Ahsaa 31982, Saudi Arabia.
  • Google Scholar
Maged Elsayed Mohamed
  • Maged Elsayed Mohamed
  • Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Clinical Pharmacy, King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 11 November 2017  Accepted: 25 January 2018  Published: 14 February 2018

Copyright © 2018 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


The existence of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) was figured out in different locations in Al-Ahsaa of Saudi Arabia. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results of samples collected showed that TYLCV existed in all locations. Using AVcore and ACcore primers, begomoviruses family were detected in symptomatic tomato plants and by using TYv2664 and TYc138 (specific primers for the detection of TYLCV), the results proved that the samples were infected with TYLCV. The lipid-soluble fraction of healthy and infected tomato leaves extract was compared using gas chromatography techniques. A total of 46 compounds were identified in both healthy and virus-infected leaf tissues; among which 37 metabolites were common between both samples and increased or decreased in concentration due to the virus attack. Nevertheless, eight compounds were exclusively detected in the infected samples with only one compound consumed and thus recognized only in the healthy samples. The classifications and roles of the identified metabolites were discussed from the point of view of plant defense mechanisms or virus resistance against plant defense.

Key words: Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), begomoviruses, Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), gas chromatography.

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APA Soliman, A. M., & Mohamed, M. E. (2018). Tomato yellow leaf curl virus: Diagnosis and metabolites. African Journal of Biotechnology , 17(7), 198-205.
Chicago Ahmed Mohamed Soliman, and Maged Elsayed Mohamed,. "Tomato yellow leaf curl virus: Diagnosis and metabolites." African Journal of Biotechnology 17, no. 7 (2018): 198-205.
MLA Ahmed Mohamed Soliman, et al. "Tomato yellow leaf curl virus: Diagnosis and metabolites." African Journal of Biotechnology 17.7 (2018): 198-205.
   
DOI https://doi.org/10.5897/AJB2017.16315
URL http://www.academicjournals.org/journal/AJB/article-abstract/84D23C755917

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