African Journal of Agricultural Research
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Article Number - 526FDFB51785


Vol.10(12), pp. 1376-1385 , March 2015
DOI: 10.5897/AJAR2014.8901
ISSN: 1991-637X



Full Length Research Paper

Comparing stakeholder views for mutual acceptable food value chain upgrading strategies in Tanzania



Lutengano Mwinuka
  • Lutengano Mwinuka
  • The University of Dodoma (UDOM), School of Business Studies and Economics, Dodoma,Tanzania.
  • Google Scholar
Isa Schneider
  • Isa Schneider
  • Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF). e. V., Institute for Socio-Economics, Müncheberg, German.
  • Google Scholar
Claude Maeda
  • Claude Maeda
  • University of Dar es Salaam (UDSM), Department of Economics, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
  • Google Scholar
Khamaldin D. Mutabazi
  • Khamaldin D. Mutabazi
  • Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA), Department of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness, Morogoro, Tanzania.
  • Google Scholar
Jeremia Makindara
  • Jeremia Makindara
  • Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA), Department of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness, Morogoro, Tanzania.
  • Google Scholar
Frieder Graef
  • Frieder Graef
  • Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF). e. V., Institute of Land Use Systems, Müncheberg, German
  • Google Scholar
Stefan Sieber
  • Stefan Sieber
  • Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF). e. V., Institute for Socio-Economics, Müncheberg, German.
  • Google Scholar
Elirehema Swai
  • Elirehema Swai
  • Agricultural Research Institute (ARI) ? Hombolo, Dodoma, Tanzania.
  • Google Scholar
Hadijah Mbwana
  • Hadijah Mbwana
  • Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA), Department of Food Science and Technology, Morogoro, Tanzania.
  • Google Scholar
Martha Swamila
  • Martha Swamila
  • World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), ICRAF-Tanzania Country Programme, Dares Salaam, Tanzania.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 06 June 2014  Accepted: 11 March 2015  Published: 19 March 2015

Copyright © 2015 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


The number of rural poor has been reported to rise in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) while per capita food consumption in the region is on the decline and food insecurity has been much embedded. Thus, knowing upgrading strategies (UPS) to be used in making a living and would have great chance of benefiting majority hence provide solutions to poverty, food insecurity and malnutrition. This paper assesses and compares the views of local stakeholders and agricultural experts in terms of prioritizing food securing UPS along food value chains (FVC). Data and information have been collected in a highly participatory process so as to develop an approach and experience in Tanzania regions to support poor people in rural areas to upgrade their position in viable FVC. Local stakeholders’ definition of food security rely on food availability component, hence this paper centers on two major FVC components such as natural resources and crop production for maize and millet subsectors in Morogoro and Dodoma regions of Tanzania, respectively. Given natural resources, agricultural experts favor soil improving upgrading strategies in Morogoro and water management in Dodoma, whereby, local stakeholders in both regions prefer farm inputs related UPS for improving soil fertility (seed varieties improvement and fertilizer use). There is no significant mismatch of views for production component apart from differences on ranks. Stakeholders in both regions prefer use of improved crop varieties, pests and diseases control and new livestock management including having village land use planning. It is recommended that satisfactory participation of local stakeholders should be considered during testing stage of FVC upgrading strategies, including packing these innovations to suit local conditions and finally empower all potential actors for successful dissemination and outreach.

 

Key words: Rural household, food security, upgrading strategy, food value chain, Tanzania.

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APA Mwinuka, L., Schneider, I., Maeda, C., Mutabazi, K. D., Makindara, J., Graef, F., Sieber, S., Swai, E., Mbwana, H., & Swamila, M. (2015). Comparing stakeholder views for mutual acceptable food value chain upgrading strategies in Tanzania. African Journal of Agricultural Research, 10(12), 1376-1385.
Chicago Lutengano Mwinuka, Isa Schneider, Claude Maeda, Khamaldin D. Mutabazi, Jeremia Makindara, Frieder Graef, Stefan Sieber, Elirehema Swai, Hadijah Mbwana and Martha Swamila. "Comparing stakeholder views for mutual acceptable food value chain upgrading strategies in Tanzania." African Journal of Agricultural Research 10, no. 12 (2015): 1376-1385.
MLA Lutengano Mwinuka, et al. "Comparing stakeholder views for mutual acceptable food value chain upgrading strategies in Tanzania." African Journal of Agricultural Research 10.12 (2015): 1376-1385.
   
DOI 10.5897/AJAR2014.8901
URL http://www.academicjournals.org/journal/AJAR/article-abstract/526FDFB51785

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